G

Good Time Credit

Refers to the reduction of up to 54 days per year a defendant may earn for good conduct in prison. The Bureau of Prisons awards the credit, which applies to sentences greater than 12 months. Also called “good conduct” credit.

Grade A Violation

A Grade A violation occurs when a defendant breaks the rules of his or her supervision by engaging in conduct constituting a federal, state or local offense punishable by a term of imprisonment exceeding one year that is a crime of violence, a drug trafficking offense or involves the possession of certain firearms or any other federal, state or local offense punishable by a term of imprisonment exceeding twenty years.

Grade B Violation

A violation for conduct constituting any other federal, state of local offense punishable by a term of imprisonment exceeding one year.

Grade C Violation

A violation for conduct constituting a federal, state or local offense punishable by a term of imprisonment of one year or less or a violation of any other condition of supervision.

Grouping of Multiple Counts

Chapter Three, Part D of the Guidelines Manual provides rules for determining a single offense level for all the counts of which a defendant is convicted. For certain offenses, multiple counts are treated as one count of conviction when determining the guidelines range (for example drug-trafficking and fraud offenses). For other offenses, a separate guidelines range is calculated for each count of conviction (for example robbery, assault) and the grouping rules determine the incremental increase in punishment for each additional count.

Guideline Range

The result of determining the final offense level and criminal history category for the defendant. The intersection of these determinations on the Sentencing Table provides the applicable guideline range.