Judiciary Sentencing Information

What is the Judiciary Sentencing INformation (JSIN) platform?

The Judiciary Sentencing INformation (JSIN) platform is an online sentencing data resource specifically developed with the needs of judges in mind. The platform provides quick and easy online access to sentencing data for similarly-situated defendants. JSIN expands upon the Commission’s longstanding practice of providing sentencing data at the request of federal judges by making some of the data provided through these special requests more broadly and easily available. If the court does consider the sentencing information provided by JSIN as part of its consideration of the factors in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a) when imposing sentence, it should do so only after considering the properly calculated guideline range and any applicable departures provided for in the Guidelines Manual.

 



 

Frequently Asked Questions

What information does JSIN provide?

JSIN provides cumulative data based on five years of sentencing data for offenders sentenced under the same primary guideline, and with the same Final Offense Level and Criminal History Category selected. JSIN first provides statistical information relating to the sentence relative to the guideline range for the selected cell. After excluding cases involving a §5K1.1 substantial assistance departure, JSIN next provides a comparison of the proportion of offenders sentenced to a term of imprisonment to those sentenced to a non-imprisonment sentence. Finally, JSIN provides the national average and median length of imprisonment for offenders in the selected cell who received a sentence of imprisonment in whole or in part.

Note that JSIN will NOT report sentencing information if fewer than three offenders meet the selected criteria and received a sentence of imprisonment (in whole or in part).


How do I navigate the JSIN platform?

The JSIN tool enables a user to obtain information about offenders sentenced under the same primary guideline, and with the same Final Offense Level and Criminal History Category selected, for the past five fiscal years. Using the menu on the left-hand side of the page, users may select the primary Chapter Two sentencing guideline. For cases involving drug trafficking, the user must also specify the primary drug involved in that offense. By clicking within a specific cell in the Sentencing Table—the intersection of the applicable Final Offense Level and Criminal History Category—the results will populate on the right-hand side of the screen. In the results section, JSIN aggregates results for all cases matching the three criteria selected: 1) the primary sentencing guideline, 2) the Final Offense Level, and 3) the Criminal History Category. Note that JSIN will NOT report sentencing information if fewer than three offenders meet the selected criteria and received a sentence of imprisonment (in whole or in part). For most analyses, including the average and median length of imprisonment, cases in which §5K1.1 substantial assistance departures were granted are excluded.


Which fiscal years are used to calculate the average and median sentence?

JSIN’s results are calculated using the most recent five full fiscal years of Commission sentencing data. The Commission collects and reports its annual sentencing data using the fiscal year cycle followed by the Federal government’s annual budget. The fiscal year runs from October 1 of the prior year through September 30 of the year described. For example, FY 2021 will include any offenders sentenced on October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2021. Sentencing information reported by JSIN is dynamic and will change over time as data for future fiscal years are added.


What is the “primary sentencing guideline” if multiple guidelines apply?

When more than one sentencing guideline is applied in a case, the “primary sentencing guideline” is the guideline that produces the highest adjusted Final Offense Level based on the Base Offense Level, all applicable Specific Offense Characteristics, and Chapter Three Adjustments prior to the application of multiple count units.


Which drug type do I select and what is the “primary drug type” if multiple drug types are involved?

In order to obtain data regarding drug trafficking offenses, JSIN requires both a guideline and information on drug type. In a case involving multiple substances, the primary drug type in JSIN is based on the drug type that produces the highest Base Offense Level.


How is average and median length of imprisonment determined in the results?

JSIN reports the average and median term of imprisonment imposed in months for cases in which a term of imprisonment was imposed. Probation sentences are excluded. Any portion of a sentence that is an alternative confinement as described in §5C1.1 of the Guidelines Manual is also excluded. Cases in which a sentence is imposed, but where the length is indeterminable, are excluded. When sentences are expressed as “time served” on the J&C, Commission staff uses the dates in federal custody to determine the length of time served, provided the offender has been in custody the entire time from arrest to sentencing. If the offender has been in and out of custody, or the start date is unclear/missing, then the Commission assigns a value of one day as a minimal time served amount for these cases. In cases where the court imposes a sentence of life imprisonment, sentences are reported as 470 months, a length consistent with the average life expectancy of federal criminal offenders given the average age of federal offenders. Sentences of greater than 470 months are also reported as 470 months.


JSIN reported that an insufficient number of offenders met my selected criteria during the last five fiscal years. What does that mean?

In order to provide sentencing information for similarly situated offenders, JSIN aggregates results for all offenders matching the three criteria selected (thereby falling in a particular cell on the Sentencing Table): 1) the primary sentencing guideline, 2) the Final Offense Level, and 3) the Criminal History Category. As the number of offenders is not evenly distributed across the Sentencing Table, there are times when too few offenders were sentenced under a particular cell to conduct a meaningful statistical analysis. Consistent with Commission practice, JSIN will NOT report sentencing information if fewer than three offenders meet the selected criteria.


Does the Commission recommend that a federal judge consider information obtained from JSIN in deciding an appropriate sentence in a particular case?

The average and median sentencing data provided by JSIN does not reflect the Commission’s recommendation regarding the appropriate sentence to be imposed or represent the Commission’s official position on any issue or case. Nor does the information provided reflect the Commission’s position regarding the weight to be given, if any, to national average and median sentences in a court’s determination of the appropriate sentence to be imposed.


Who can I ask if I run into a problem with JSIN and need assistance?

Send your inquiry regarding the JSIN platform to PubAffairs@ussc.gov.